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. >> susan rice has done a great job as our ambassador to the unit nations. of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> still rice had to spend another rough day on capitol hill discussing benghazi with skeptical senate republicans. >> the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. >> one rice ally, senator joe lieberman tried to take the focus off of rice this morning. >> i hope we can focus on what i think are the more important parts of our investigation which is what did our government know and what could it have done before the terrorist attack to protect the lives of the americans who were there. >> don't forget something here. this is not susan rice's first political rodeo. he didn't suddenly appear from team obama land in 2008. she has a lot of friends in this town, very experienced in washingto
the depression and world war ii. "american artifacts." >> the united nation's thursday voted in favor of palestinian statehood. the resolution upgraded the palestinian stat us to a non-member observer state. members approved by a more than 2/3 majority of the 193-member asemlybly. a vote of 138-9. susan rice said there are further obstacles. israel and the u.s. voted against the resolution. the the chairperson of the executive committee of the palestinian liberation organization and president of the palestinian authority. [applause] [applause] >> the poverty general assembly. secretary general, ladies and gentlemen. palestine comes today to the united nations general assembly at the time it is still tending to its wounds and -- beloved martyrs of children, women and men who have fallen victims to the latest israeli aggression, still searches for remnants of life turned ruins of homes strailed by israeli bombs on the gaza strip wiping out entire families. men, women and children along with their dreams, their hopes, their future and their longing to live an ordinary life and to live in
they're troubled by what the united nations ambassador susan rice is telling them. and now the acting cia director has some serious problems as well. president obama pulls out all the stops to keep middle class taxes low, but will congress go along with higher taxes for the rich? plus, a long secret u.s. plan, get this, to explode an atomic bomb on the moon. what were they thinking? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> today we may be at the tipping point for one of the most important decisions president obama needs to make as he begins his second term. on capitol hill republicans including moderate republicans are sending the president a clear warning, don't nominate susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. rice is the current u.s. ambassador to the united nations. she spent a second day meeting with senators trying to explain some of her inaccurate comments she made after the september 11th terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is joining us now from capitol hill with the ver
at the united nations. the world defies the u.s. in a historic vote for palestinians. and huge crowds are gathering in tahrir square after egypt approved a controversial new draft constitution. it's a move that's likely to inflame the political crisis there. we're live in cairo with what it all means for the region. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. he is in pennsylvania at the toy factory talking fiscal cliff. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me
a comment. >> susan rice has done a great job as ambassador to the united nations and, of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president but i'm very happy he has the opportunity ability to make a second term decision. >> a strong praise of support for hillary clinton. republicans have been trying to draw up controversy over the attacks but they have a big problem. ambassador rice had absolutely no role in embassy security and republicans know this basic fact, completely destroys their bogus argument. so today gop senators cooked up a whole new talking point and it might be their most offensive attack yet. >> what troubles me so much is the benghazi attack, in many ways echos the attacks on those embassies in 1998 when susan rice was head of the african region for our state department. >> my colleague from maine raised some very important questions about the embassy bombings. those are questions that should be answered as well. >> they are exploiting another national tragedy. the 1998 embassy attacks in kenya killed more than 200 people, including 12 americans ov
by palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas, upon his return to cheering crowds in palestine. the united nations general assembly thursday voted to accept palestine as a nonmember observer state. president abbas sees the move as a key step toward palestinian independence. only nine countries opposed the vote, including the united states and israel. friday, date after the vote, israel announced construction plans for some 3,000 new homes in israeli settlements on the west bank and in east jerusalem as well. at today's israeli cabinet meeting, prime minister benjamin netanyahu said quote we will carry on building. i want to bring in former senate majority leader, george mitchell. senator mitchell, president clinton's special envoy to northern ireland and served as two years as president obama's special envoy to middle east peace. thank you for stopping by. israel's announcement of increased settlement construction, criticized kbi the white house as quote counterproductive. france, great britain and the eu also criticized. >> the location as opposed to the number. the announcement to build on the a
on the senate floor, did not stop republicans from voting down a united nations treaty that would promote equal rights and better treatment for the disabled around the world which says is inspired by the americans with disabilities act. noefrdz i in other words by a u.s. law. >> it's unthinkable that americans could not get over a curb or enter a school building or watch a debate if they were in a wheelchair. >> that's why a veteran comes back to the senate on an early december day because it matters. >> despite those pleas from two former presidential nominees, just eight republican senators voted to ratify the treaty sending it down in defeat. every senator up for re-election in 2014 except susan collins who, by the way, is from a blue state, voted against it. lindsey graham cast a no vote though john mccain was one of the treaty's biggest advocates. kelly ayotte voted for it. mississippi senator thad cochrane voted in favor and then as it was going down switched his vote to no. cochrane up in 2014. mississippi more worried about a primary than a general. this is one of of the saddest days i'
service. she's done a great job i think for us at the united nations. she's fought tirelessly for america's interests in very difficult times. when the united nations is a place where we often face significant challenges. and i understand that there was a lot of concern and anger initially about benghazi and about what happened and about the differences and reports but as this has been peeled back and more and more of the details have come out as best as i can make sense of it, the persistent criticism of her is that she represented the administration, went on talking -- went on different talk shows and went different radio shows and presented it based on intelligence she was given. this is far from the first time that a secretary of state u.n. ambassador has been given bad intelligence and repeated it publicly and why that makes her somehow unfit to serve as secretary of state is beyond me. in my view, if there's some unhappiness about the incidence in benghazi, some deep concern about security, there ought to be
the information that he gave before the united nations that led us into the iraq war? did that make colin powell unfit to be secretary of state or was colin powell given bad intel? i never heard him say that. i never heard lindsey graham say that. >> condoleezza rice. >> same thing with condoleezza rice. she gave bad information to congress, not just to a sunday morning talk show. to congress. to congress. >> how can you say these three people we saw on video, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte and senator john mccain are not jumping into an intelligence debate for political reasons because they did not speak up at other very key times, even perhaps more significant times in -- >> we get the point. i think we all agree. maybe there are people out there across america who are saying, you know what we really need, we really need people to fight hard night and day to sidetrack secretary of state potential candidate because of some things she said on -- maybe there's people out there. i don't know where they are because i've never met them but do want to know this. like what's their long game, willie? wha
as our ambassador to the united nations. this decision about my successor is up to the president but i'm very happy he has the opportunity with a second term to make a decision. >> secretary of state, hillary clinton, coming to the defense of his possible successor, u.n. ambassador susan rice. yet, the smear campaign against susan rice continues as more republicans pile on. rice had another tough day on capitol hill today. now, senate republicans are blaming rice for yet another security failure. the u.s. embassy bombings in kenya and tanzania 14 years ago. >> it troubles me so much is the benghazi attack in many ways echos the attacks of those embassies in 1998 when susan rice was head of the african region for our state department. >> senator bob corker in tennessee had a warning for the president. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. >> while republicans say they are concerned about susan rice advancing bad intel, they didn't think twice about co
to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> today, republican senators continued to try to open up the massachusetts senate seat that scott brown could run for. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> if the president wants an easy confirmation hearing and process, nominate john kerry, who is imminently qualified to be secretary of state and i believe he would sail through in the nominating process. >> joining me now, ari mel ber. ari, you're coming to us tonight from kerry country, boston and i've got to think this is a horrible moment for senator kerry. you don't want to be the guy who gets praise from the mindless attackers of susan rice. >> yeah, i don't think he wants any part of this very weird b m boomerang play the republicans are trying to practice. he knows her well because as chairman of foreign relations committee, he oversees the state department, looking at the diplomacy and ambassadors and working with secretary clinton and ambassador rice. >> well, t
's dealing with syria gaza, the congo. she's still our representative to the united nations. so while we're talking this foolishness about her appearance on a tv talk show, what signal is that sending to the rest of the world? i do think they've got themselves backed in a corner now. i think the other agenda going on is the senate race. so i think that it needs to stop. i hope it will today. i know she's back on the hill again today. >> bill: she is. first of all, it is unfair at so many levels. i think it is sexist and racist. ambassador to the united nations, god knows is not responsible for security. embassies and consulates around the world number one. we talked about this earlier. number two, all she did in her appearance on the sunday shows and in her testimony right after the incident in benghazi on the hill was say here is what our intelligence agencies are telling us at this point. we don't know everything about it yet. you know. and that's -- that's kind of classic. you never know, right? immediately, al
and the united nations. prime minister, thanks, as usual, for joining us. >> thank you, wolf. >> good to see you the other day in jerusalem. let's talk about what's happening in the middle east right now. the u.s., the obama administration, nato now obviously very concerned about the regime of president assad potentially using chemical weapons, poison gas against its own people. here's the question, what is the difference killing civilians in syria with bombs from jet fighters or attack helicopters as opposed to using say poison gas or chemical warfare? >> that's a good question. in one sense in moral terms, there is no difference and almost 40,000 people have died in syria already. but i think the use of chemical weapons and poison gas, i think the fatalities would be very much greater. and it does cross a line. these aren't judgments that you can make in any scientific way. but i think what your administration, the international community is signaling to president assad, if you cross that line, there will be a strong reaction. >> those are tough words coming from president obama, from secretar
this afternoon in the united nations general assembly. palestine palestinians are asking to be upgraded to nonmember state. if it passes it is a u.n. recognition of palestine statehood. mahmoud abass is in new york to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the pale
threat to the united states' national security. as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, i got asked that all the time. i answered in two words: our debt. i think i surprised him. today 15 former senior national security officials who served across eight presidential administrations have formed a coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in res
. >> senator, do you think that this might have passed if the words united nations were not attached to it? talk to me about this fear of the u.n. angered the u.n., some appropriate, some not, the black helicopter deal? >> there's a lot of fear that the u.n. is somehow going to encroach on united states sovereignty and prerogatives. one of the things i thought was most sad about yesterday, was here's a veteran of world war ii, grievously wounded in the war, who spent a lifetime proving to americans that injuries didn't need to stop you from living a completely fulfilled and productive life, who had to fight like crazy to come back from those wounds, and he's on the floor, this man who defended american sovereignty, and yet people were there suggesting somehow he was there less than to defend america's sovereignty with this vote. to me that was such an amazing slap in the face and a contradiction. i think it's important not to go backwards. one of the lessons you learn here in the united states senate you live to vote another day. this treaty is not dead forever. it just stopped yesterday.
's your policy? >>> developing right now, we are about 45 minutes away from a united nations general assembly session that will result in a historic vote on palestinian statehood. there have already been rallies today in the palestinian territories in support of a resolution upgrading the palestinian's u.n. status to a nonmember state. the resolution is expected to win overwhelming approval in the general assembly despite strong opposition by the u.s. and israel. here's israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier today. >> the palestinians must recognize the jewish state. and they must be prepared to end the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these vital interests, these vital interests of peace, none of them appear in the resolution that will be put forward before the general assembly today. and that is why israel cannot accept it. >> joining me now to talk more about this, former state department mideast officer joel ruben. also palestinian italian journalist and msnbc contributor willa jabroe. both israel and the u.s. say the resolution violates agreements to sol
. >>> the other big story we're watching for you, a second round of sitdowns for united nations ambassador susan rice, who's in an all-out campaign of her own to face her critics. after three republicans issued blistering comments yesterday, this morning rice is meeting with republican senator susan collins of maine and in an hour is expected to meet with senator bob corker of tennessee. rice's harshest krit eks are still vowing to block her potential nomination as next secretary of state. >> i think everybody gets to, one, be nominated, and, two, go through the hearings and the debate and discussion. but right now i would be very hard-press hard-pressed. >> what they're suging is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. >> what's the long game, willy? what are they doing? this doesn't help the republican party. >> that is the big question. what is the long game? let's dig down. we have our wednesday political power panel, msnbc contributor joanne reed, managing editor for the gree owe, msnbc contributor arty melbourne, also a cords for the nation, and republic
to the united nations. this time from two moderate republican senators, susan collins and bob corker. both considered integral to rice's chances of becoming secretary of state if, in fact, she is nominated by the president. senator collins was the more critical of the two. she took the ambassador to task for using intelligence talking points in the aftermath of the attack in benghazi. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. >> senator corker declined to give deep details of the meeting but instead delivered a hit directed at the whole of washington. >> the whole issue of benghazi has been to me a tawdry affair. everything about it. i have found no heroes here in washington. >> and for the second day in a row press secretary carny defended the president's ambassador to the u.n. >> my view on this is the same as it was y
a host of international criticism also coming from the united nations saying that morsi's power grab is illegal. >> there was certainly a lot of hope for egyptians that were looking for a change with morsi after getting rid of hosni mubarak. what options are there for any type of compromise for the protesters? again, this draft resolution needs to move on for approval, but is there time to reach any type of compromise that would appease the protesters that are opposed to it? >> reporter: it seems very difficult. egypt is very divided right now. the one camp, the one here in tahrir square, is anti-morsi, anti-muslim brotherhood. they saw also that the united states has been too quick to embrace the muslim brotherhood, and that has emboldened morsi to allow himself to become a dictator or to become a new phara pharaoh. morsi is digging in. he gave a speech last night on television. it was formatted as an interview, but it was still a speech in which he said, i'm sorry. i didn't mean to take all of these extra powers, but i did it for the sake of the nation. >> nbc's richard engel in ta
endorsement yesterday when the united nations general assembly voted to upgrade its status to non-member state. >> but the united states and israel strongly, strongly oppose this resolution, claiming the unilateral move is no substitute for direct negotiations with israel. cnn foreign affairs reporter elise labott has more on this developing story in washington at the united nations and the middle east. >> good morning, john. as we said the vote is really a global endorsement of the establishment of a palestinian state. and it gives the palestinians a bit of hope and a bit of dignity after so many decades of occupation that a state is actually possible. let's take a listen to what palestinian president mahmoud abbas said after the vote yesterday. >> we did not come here seeking to legitimize a state established years ago. and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and that is palestine. >> but the u.s. is calling it an empty gesture because it doesn't really give the palestinians what they want. anything on the ground isn't l
. >> thanks for starting our morning like that, victor. >> it's a big day at the united nations. as well a big day for palestinians. they are asking members of the general assembly to approve a resolution to upgrade their status from permanent observer to nonmember state. a vote is scheduled for this afternoon and is expected to pass. >> keep in mind the united states and israel are both opposed to the resolution. let's go to cnn foreign affairs reporter live in washington. good morning. >> good morning, brooke. israel very opposed to the move. the u.s. knows this move went give the palestinians what they want -- a state. this is largely symbolic. will have no effect on sovereignty or borders. hillary clinton met with president abbas and tried to assure him not to go ahead with the move. let's listen to what she told reporters yesterday. sfm know matter what happens it will not change what i support. the only way to get a lasting solution is to commence direct negotiations and we need an environment conducive to that. we have urged both parties to refrain from actions that might in any way mak
. come back with more and we'll have you again. thank you so much. >>> united nations ambassador susan rice and whether race plays into the criticism. i'll speak with ben jealous here in the next hour of "weekends with alex witt." with the spark miles card from capital one, thor gets great rewards for his small business! your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics. put it on my spark card. ow. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve great rewards. [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] >>> good day to all of you. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." we're going to get to what's happening out there. sharp words from a key negotiator as we inch closer to the fiscal cliff. timothy geithner on the president's offer to to republicans followed by a response from grover norquist. >> we're trying to make it mo
resolution the united nations general assembly that just passed. because it places further obstacles in the path to peace. we have been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace they both deserve. two states for two peoples. they sovereign a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a won
lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: vote: vote: the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 61, the nays are 38, two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of ratification is not agreed to. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: both senator mcconnell and i have approv
times." the united nations has voted overwhelmingly to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. shsymbolic victory that palestinians hope will strengthen their hand in future peace talks. both the u.s. and israel strongly object to the move, arguing that palestinians must first recognize israel's right to exist before gaining new rights at the u.n. >>> all right. harold, let's do "the l.a. times." >> i enjoyed watching him do it. >> i'm getting nervous. "los angeles times." a new study finds ice sheet melting in greenland and an antarctica, more than 300 billion tons of glacial ice are lost each year. the earth's sea level has risen eight inches since pre-industrialization times. >> that was a good read. you were overemphasizing a tad bit, but i like it. i'll give you some lessons. >> my posture, do i do this? >> you just want to be centered. you want to be strength, warmth, confidence is what you want to exude. you want to cluster some words so you don't bore people. >> i thought i was talking too fast. >> in my next life, i'm going to be a consultant and teach people how to t
/11, 2001, and talk to a nations, of very international crowd and ask what they thought of the united states, admired the united states and they resented the united states because it that time they didn't believe there were any boundaries to what could be done. that looks at the united states as the most innovative place in the world, constantly pull rabbits out of the hat and reinvent itself. go around world today facie a nation constrained, tied down, exhausted, limited, militarily overreaching, economically--even talking to tim geithner, can you go around and tell other economies what to do when you're in a glass house? it has been real limiting. when you look at barack obama's first meeting with angela merkel in london when the global economy was on fire is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet. we are not going to play by your rules. we are not going to spend like you are telling us to do. it has been interesting as a superpower to look at all limits we have even influencing a nation like germany. and yet brussels i asked to you think america has the same growth we once had that could
to their countries to build those nations, and we want that to continue. we want them to come to the united states of america and go back to their country and foster democracy and good will. so many of them do that. but not all the 29,000 stay here. so what happens? you eliminate 50,000 visas. you say we're going to give you 55,000. you know you only can use 29,000. it's a net loss. the people on the other side of the aisle keep telling us, why don't they come through the legal way? why don't they come through the legal way? why do they always have to go under, around? they should come here legally. because we're for legal immigration. not today you're for legal immigration, because in the end you reduce the ability of people to come legally to the united states of america, and that is the diversity program, a program that allows. and lastly, let me just be very, very clear. . when we look at this and talk about the continent of africa, we think it's important that every continent of the world be able to come here and contribute to the great nation that is because that is the diversity in the grea
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
.o.t., in comparison, in 1958 through 2012, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit, and yet amtrak, which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that funding at $41 billion. when you consider that and compare it to the oil and gas industry, which received $441 billion in federal subsidies, although more than half of those have been available to the energy sector. we have spent to bring that together, we spent more in one year with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industry than we have spent in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high speed rail, the amtrak excela service is one of those alternatives and know it may only achieve the speeds of average of 83 miles per hour, along the n.e.c., surely that is significantly better than the long delays in crawling engagor interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the role as it always has to facilitate the development o
. they're toward the end of their existence as a great nation. >> they would have young women who became pregnant would get them into the united states to have a baby. they wouldn't even have to pay anything for the baby. and then they would return back where they could be raised and coddled as future terrorists. and then one day 20, 30 years down the road, they could be sent in to help destroy our way of life because they figured out how stupid we are being. >> that kind of conversation and conspiracy theories are commonplace for certain republicans but for some reason, they just always seem to get away with it. for more, let's turn to democratic consultant tara dowdell. tara, is this something we're going to have to put up with that they're never going to change, they can't stand president obama so much that this is operating procedure as normal for them? >> it certainly seems to be. this is valely unreal. i don't think louie gohmert should even be in congress. this is, because the problem here, ed, is not just he's saying these crazy things. the problem is some people are listening an
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
. as a nation we have done better, as the united states house of representatives. and i come here today just to remind my president, the white house, that the election is over. the time for clever sound bites that register on the public opinion polls is far behind us. in front of us are hard, hard decisions that this house has led on and that we are waiting patiently for partnership to work on and to pass. i want to leave you three numbers, mr. speaker. h.r. 5652, h.r. 5652, it's the -- it was passed in may called the sequester replacement reconciliation act. it was the house passed idea to avoid the debilitating sequester cuts that we see coming. to deal with the mandatory spending side of the equation, passed in a bipartisan way here in the house. only proposal to have been passed by a body. passed in may. leave you with h.r. 8, mr. speaker. the job protection and recession prevention act. that's our plan, house passed plan, for how to deal with these tax increases that threaten america's family owned business, threaten our economy. how to deal with them in a responsible way, get us passed
complete plan... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ progresso. in what world do
coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, romney, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how romney would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate romney was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what romney didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goalie. they just shot goals on him for four years and some of them went through and some of them didn't a
... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ >>> hi, everybody. i'm thomas robert
is routine for us. people want the united states to climb out of this whole and fix this problem. the clock is ticking. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] what next, the former court shares of the former the opposite commission -- that is a commission -- deficit commission. and upcoming health policy debates in congress. washington journal begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern with headlines, calls, e-mails and tweets. >> washington worked his way up, went to harvard law school that emigrated west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after about a month journey by ship and stagecoach in train and arrived in a muddy mining town, established in law practice in a log cabin. then slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer. then got involved politically, ran for congress eight terms. then the french did abraham lincoln -- then befriended abraham lincoln and ulysses s. grant. as they are on the rise, washburn stayed with them as a close confidant during the civil war.
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